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Current and past administrations have tried to tap into the potential of Ethiopians living abroad. As much as there always has been the understanding that the diaspora can play a greater role in the Ethiopian economy, politics has always taken over the way in which government looks at this vast community.

The Ethiopian diaspora—vocal in their criticism of local politics—has long been regarded as a threat to government. Hence, they have been alienated from social, political, and economic activities of their home country. For the most part, the nation has not been able to tap into the opportunities of economic potential which the community possesses.

The recent mobilization of the diaspora in the diplomatic arena gives an insight into their economic potential. If mobilized upon the appropriate strategy, they can play a greater role beyond remittance and direct financial support to be investors and champions of investment, writes EBR’s Bamlak Fekadu.



It’s the beginning of the end of Western-hegemony

The war that has been waged against Ethiopia by neo-colonists is not like ones encountered before. It is multifaceted, congruent, and coordinated on several fronts, employing every possible way to enact regime change with the anticipation of complete disarray, and a civil war that proceeded to create a complete collapse.

It also set an unprecedented level of convergence between neocolonial powers, which were otherwise known to pursue unreconciled stances on several spheres. The inexplicability of this unholy alliance between these groups remains to be a mystery and a puzzle for many. Moreover, what exactly Ethiopia has done to deserve such a level of hostility and conspiracy makes the puzzle even worse deep in the cynics.



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