Ashenafi EndaleOctober 15, 2020
demonetization.jpg

1min2550

Ethiopia, which has undergone political turbulence in recent years, has now fired a direct shot at the nation’s lingering macroeconomic imbalances by unveiling a new generation of currency notes on September 14, 2020. In addition to the replacements of the old Birr 10, 50, and 100, a new 200 Birr note was also issued by the government. The five Birr note remains unchanged and will soon be turned into a coin. While the government stress that the introduction of new currency notes is part of the ongoing economic reform in the country, critics argue the move is rather driven by politics and an assertion of power. EBRs Ashenafi Endale explores.


Ashenafi EndaleAugust 15, 2020
gmo-cursed-seed.jpg

1min15811

Cut-throat Moves to Legitimize Cutting-edge Technology

The paramount friction between science and nature resumed afresh in Ethiopia, following the government’s commercialization of GMO varieties through selected farmers and the appreciation report released by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) in February, 2020. Following the amendment of Ethiopia’s strict biosafety laws in 2015, half a dozen farmers in Gambela and Benishangul regions cultivated Bt cotton in 2019 for the first time. The move is soon to be followed by GMO maize and Enset. Government officials and proponents of the technology argue that GMO is the silver bullet to do away with food insecurity. Nonetheless, growing anti-GMO groups are concerned over what they call ‘the irrationality’ behind the governmental rush for GMO. The poor productivity of the first GMO farms is also a major setback for proponents of the latest GMO manoeuvring around Ethiopia’s millennia old agriculture. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale investigates the debates to offer this report.


Ashenafi EndaleJuly 30, 2020
ETB113-bilion.jpg

1min11360
Why is it Outside the Banking System?

Just two months ago, Ethiopian Bankers Association (EBA) recommended change of currency to the government in order to reduce the amount of money circulating outside the banking system. The bankers thought this would improve the liquidity of commercial banks. However, the recommendation received a mixed reaction among the finance community. Many argue that the major reason for the sharp rise in the amount of money outside the banking system is the cash-based transaction system in the country. Economists also say that changing currencies cannot stop money laundering. They say, introducing monetary reforms is the best way to deal with the problem. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale reports.


Haimanot AshenafiJuly 15, 2020
African-Free-Trade.jpg

2min14740
Can it Help Africans Recover Quickly?

Africa accounts for 20Pct of the world population but only makes up three percent of the world GDP, at USD2.6 trillion. The implementation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) would, however, set in motion the largest regional free trade area in the world. Signed by all African countries, except for neighboring Eritrea, the agreement was supposed to be put into practice next month. However, the Coronavirus pandemic rushed in to steal its light as it did to a number of other plans around the world. Against all odds, some argue that now is the best time to launch the agreement across the continent as global supply chains are disrupted and being reconsidered by countries across the world. Even some go far as to claim AfCFTA would help African countries quickly recover from the impacts of the pandemic. Nonetheless, many say this may not hold true for Ethiopia as a few export commodities mark its comparative advantage. Haimanot Ashenafi, in her special report to EBR, explores.


Ashenafi EndaleJune 15, 2020
skyrocketing.jpg

1min16420
Is it Coming to an End?

It has repeatedly been demonstrated that major international events have the ability to shift paradigms. The post-cold war period identified by the emergence of the United States as the sole super power with other regional hegemons roaming their localities pushed neoliberal policies to the forefront of intra and inter-state relations. With considerable external pressure to adhere to these neoliberal approaches along with the theory’s revamped academic acceptance worldwide, states jumped on board. Accordingly, opening up markets and export promotion became widely accepted approaches. The Coronavirus pandemic has, however, shown that the hectic international trade practices centered on import and export in a highly globalized world have left states, both developed and underdeveloped, a long way from self-sufficiency. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale looks into the impending rise of import substitution in a post-COVID-19 Ethiopia.


Samson BerhaneMay 15, 2020
topic-85.jpg

1min25710

When news of a new strain of Coronavirus came out of China almost four months ago, the world seems unimpressed with the potential danger it posed. It has, however, taken the invisible microbe less than three months to literally make the whole world its empire. Its social, economic and political impacts have poured water on other burning issues of the world and left them on the backburner. Especially the world economy has been hard hit by the pandemic. The fates of businesses and potentially billions of employees hangs by the balance. Different sectors of the Ethiopian economy have also faced the wrath of the invisible microbe. EBR’s Samson Berhane and Ashenafi Endale delve into the global, regional and national economic impacts and emergency measures.


Ashenafi EndaleApril 15, 2020
hawasa-industry-park_2.jpg

1min30430

For over half a decade, Ethiopia has been crowned as one of the preferred destinations for foreign direct investment (FDI). Just three years ago, the country was ranked second in Africa. FDI remains a highly politicized concept and contrasts to the reality on the ground. Actual FDI capital inflow represents a small portion of the reported figures of FDI into the country. Even then, both are now in their worst shape, largely because of the political instability in the country and bureaucratic hurdles, among others. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale investigates.


Ashenafi EndaleMarch 15, 2020
landlessness.jpg

1min44910

The value of land has risen significantly in rural Ethiopia over the past few years. With the youth population rising alarmingly alongside a very sluggish rural transformation, landlessness has become a chronic problem. According to the central bank, youth aged 18 to 25 years account for more than 40% of the working age population of Ethiopia, and constitute the majority of landless people. On top of being landless, a considerable portion of them are currently unemployed. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale spoke with farmers, researchers, policymakers, and government officials to shed light on the matter.


Ashenafi EndaleFebruary 15, 2020
excise-tax.jpg

1min42540
Another ‘flawed decision’ just around the corner

Learning from media outlets of new rules, laws or regulations to be enacted the next day without any consultations with the very entities it will govern, is a very common phenomenon in Ethiopia. The new excise tax law is no different. It was after the draft proclamation was approved by the Council of Ministers that businesses affected by the amendment started to voice their concerns. While the government plans to raise tax revenues in congruence with the growth of the economy, businesses are likely to feel the brunt of the bill. Many are complaining that the bill will adversely impact their revenues, while government officials argue the amendment of excise tax rates has shifted the burden of excise tax from producers and importers to end consumers. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale investigates.


Ashenafi EndaleJanuary 1, 2020
ethiopia-nation-building.jpg

1min47140
An Endeavor Far-removed from its Goal

With Ethiopia being at a crossroads, nation-building continues to be a contentious matter amongst politicians and policymakers in Ethiopia. Attempts of successive regimes to build an economically integrated society have borne no fruit. The administration of the Revolutionary Democrats is no different. The constitution adopted 25 years ago demands the formation of a single economic community which is crucial in promoting common rights, freedoms, and interests. The reality is, however, far from the intended goal. Not only that, the main ingredients of state building, providing citizens with basic functions and services, including maintaining internal order, are still unmet. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale probes into the matter.



About us

Ethiopian Business Review is first class and high quality monthly business magazine.


CONTACT US

CALL US ANYTIME



Latest posts



Newsletter