Ashenafi EndaleJanuary 1, 2020
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1min7480

The agricultural sector remains underdeveloped and untapped in Ethiopia. Although the sector contributes a third of the country’s GDP and accounts for two-thirds of the workforce, it has not been given the attention it deserves as demonstrated by the minimal finance provided to the sector. Agriculture modernization plans have also remained a myth. Mentioning that it is high-risk, commercial banks are not willing to provide loans to farmers and other actors in the agricultural sector. Even the Development Bank of Ethiopia is no longer interested in financing farmers. Even worse, microfinance institutions, expected to reduce poverty and reach out financially excluded communities, are not in a position to provide much-needed agricultural finance. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale explores.


Kiya AliJanuary 1, 2020
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1min6770

Being home to many internationally-acclaimed historical sites, Ethiopia has an immense local tourism potential. But the country has never capitalized on the opportunity. Adding to the minimal travelling habit amongst Ethiopians, the sector is still at its infancy. Tour companies also give more attention to international tourists, largely because it garners foreign currency. Investors are not interested in joining the local tourism sector as there is a sentiment that it is a low rate-of-return investment. Meanwhile, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism is attempting to create awareness amongst the public, but little has been achieved thus far. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Ashenafi EndaleJanuary 1, 2020

1min10410

Thanks to big corporations and financial companies, Addis is becoming a city with a high number of buildings compared to east African cities. Many of these buildings were constructed by local contractors that were able to learn fast in the past two decades, though not free from flaws. Majority of buildings constructed by local contractors lack quality and basic infrastructures and have very similar designs. Frustrated, many builders are now turning their backs on local contractors, while strengthening their ties with the foreign ones, particularly those from China. Almost all big buildings, roads and dam projects throughout the country are being handled by Chinese contractors. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale investigates.


Ashenafi EndaleJanuary 1, 2020
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1min6250
Are theyAchievable?

With power interruption becoming the norm, implementing green manufacturing has been almost impossible in Ethiopia. Although there are many companies that have embraced the idea of using green energy as a source of power, poor electricity supply has forced them to be dependent on fossil fuels. Especially cement factories, and industries that require high voltage, have no choice but to spend increasing amounts of foreign currency to import coal and fuel. Such a reality, coupled with inefficient energy usage, is profoundly costing the country. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale explores.


Samson BerhaneJanuary 1, 2020
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2min8950

Buzuayehu T. Bizenu, a father of four, is a Group Chairperson of East African Holding, a de facto industrial conglomerate with 17 subsidiaries. His company is engaged in the manufacturing of fast moving consumer goods, tea processing, printing and packaging, transport, real estate, cement production, and coal mining. Although Buzuayehu has structured and re-established the company almost 25 years ago, it is his grandfather who founded the business more than a century ago, making him the third generation in a family of entrepreneurs. After his father inherited the business and diversified into milling and agriculture (coffee), his fledgling enterprise was nationalized by the Dergue regime in 1974.

While this was a major setback, the family’s dreams and aspirations were not curtailed as entrepreneurship was deeply engrained in his soul from an early age. Soon after, Buzuayehu was able to pick up after his father, although this was an extremely difficult task under communist rule. He fled to neighbouring countries to establish trading and distribution posts, opening offices in Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. He moved to Ethiopia after EPRDF took power in 1991. Attracted by a favourable private sector and industrial development policy, he quickly transitioned from trading to manufacturing and agribusiness.


Ashenafi EndaleJanuary 1, 2020
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1min13650
An Endeavor Far-removed from its Goal

With Ethiopia being at a crossroads, nation-building continues to be a contentious matter amongst politicians and policymakers in Ethiopia. Attempts of successive regimes to build an economically integrated society have borne no fruit. The administration of the Revolutionary Democrats is no different. The constitution adopted 25 years ago demands the formation of a single economic community which is crucial in promoting common rights, freedoms, and interests. The reality is, however, far from the intended goal. Not only that, the main ingredients of state building, providing citizens with basic functions and services, including maintaining internal order, are still unmet. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale probes into the matter.


Ashenafi EndaleJanuary 1, 2020
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1min6720
Why & How Ethiopia is Losing its Precious Commodity

A decade ago, gold constituted close to one-fifth of the total export earnings of Ethiopia. But the country has not been able to sustain this momentum. Last year, export income from gold plummeted to a dismaying USD32 million from 654 million in 2011/12 fiscal year. This is largely due to the growth of contraband trade and the closure of mining companies for allegedly polluting the environment. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale investigates.


Abiy WendifrawAbiy WendifrawJanuary 1, 2020

1min7860

Football is the most loved sport in Ethiopia, even though the country is more known in athletics globally. But such an affection usually ends with saddening moments as the national team has almost never been successful, except during some very few moments. Beyond that, with the absence of footballers’ association, there was no body to speak on behalf of the players. But five months ago, for the first time in history, footballers convened and established an association, which is expected to produce, in the future, skilled and well trained footballers, besides representing its founders. EBR adjunct writer Abiy Wendifraw reports.


Haimanot AshenafiJanuary 1, 2020
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1min10760
An Ethiopian-BORN GERMAN Climbing the Ladder of Success

From refugee to multi-disciplinarian, Yared Dibaba went from training with, to being chased by the Dergue regime. From his newfound home in Germany, he went on to master many fields, from media to trade, to give back to the nation that afforded him a second chance. But he reminisces his hardships as a refugee and the extra effort made to succeed in life. He believes that one should respect all human rights and be deeply rooted in culture, heritage, and self-awareness, and that Ethiopians can benefit from these virtues and should learn from one another by engaging diversity. EBR’s Haimanot Ashenafi sat down with Yared to understand his journey and aspirations.


Kiya AliJanuary 1, 2020
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1min10030

In the past, very few traditional/ cultural restaurants operated in Addis and most of them were criticized for lacking diversity and failing to portray the culture and foods of all Ethiopians. Lately however, traditional restaurants specialized on the foods of a certain ethnic group are rising. Among them are Sidama, Wolayita and Oromo (Wollega) traditional food restaurants. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.



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