Ermias MulugetaMarch 15, 2020
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1min3570

Major traffic accidents have become an everyday occurrence in today’s Ethiopia. Traffic accidents killed more than 5,118 people during the past fiscal year alone. Beyond the statistic, there is the story of a father or mother, a son or daughter, a brother or sister, a grandchild, a colleague, or a classmate or friend whose life has been distorted in an instant by a road accident. EBR’s Ermias Mulugeta explores.


Kiya AliFebruary 15, 2020
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1min7690

Abebech Gobena defines selfless giving, even losing her marriage to help someone in dire need of help. Life-long friends and colleagues witness her altruistic acts. Indeed, she is a living testament that someone’s inner candle will not go off as long as it lights up another candle. Her endeavors range from caring for children in need as well as economically developing other members of her community. Her work is perhaps the first of its kind in Ethiopia—an inspiration to many—and her name and goodwill will live long. EBR’s Kiya Ali looks into this exceptional woman’s life and work.


Kiya AliJanuary 1, 2020
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1min10020

In the past, very few traditional/ cultural restaurants operated in Addis and most of them were criticized for lacking diversity and failing to portray the culture and foods of all Ethiopians. Lately however, traditional restaurants specialized on the foods of a certain ethnic group are rising. Among them are Sidama, Wolayita and Oromo (Wollega) traditional food restaurants. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliDecember 12, 2019
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1min7790

Neither homeless people nor street children are not new to Addis Ababa. They have existed for decades along with the growing urbanization in the country. Now it is believed that there are more than 150,000 street children and homeless people in Ethiopia and more than half of them live on the streets of the capital. The problem is far from over, even after the rehabilitation programs implemented by the city administration, federal government, and NGOs. EBR’s Kiya Ali writes.


Kiya AliNovember 29, 2019
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1min7710
Infrastructure Developments Fail to Accommodate the Needs of Disabled Persons

Despite accounting for 17.6Pct of the population, people with disabilities are often note very well taken into consideration in many development projects in Ethiopia. Most Infrastructure is developed without taking into consideration their mobility and other physical challenges. For the deaf or visually impaired, most of the streets are not friendly. While sidewalks end abruptly and ramps which are the only means of getting in and out of premises, are so steep that wheelchairs sometimes overturn. In addition, apartment houses are constructed without accommodating the special needs of people with disabilities, as is with malls and buildings of government offices which are built recklessly with no elevators and ramps. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliOctober 29, 2019
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1min25810

The use of traditional bonesetters to treat musculoskeletal injuries is common in Ethiopia. Joro Shanko, who lost her sight while in grade five, is the most sought after by many in this regard. Gaining popularity among urbanites in Addis Ababa, she is known for healing many suffering from bone fractures and various complications. EBR’s Kiya Ali visited Joro at her house, where she provides services to her patients, to learn what makes her distinct.


Kiya AliSeptember 28, 2019
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1min42620

Domestic violence is a global pandemic and a form of human rights violation. One in three women experiences violence from an intimate partner worldwide. This is more common in developing countries in general and Ethiopia in particular. With the rising level of reported abuses against women by their intimate partners, the problem has become a cross-cutting issue interlinked with everyday routines. EBR’s Kiya Ali spoke with victims, psychologists, government officials and legal experts to shed light on the matter.


Kiya AliAugust 28, 2019
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1min42950
Crime in the City Goes Through the Roof

Addis Ababa, home to over four million people, hosts more than 100 diplomatic and international organization missions. The City’s full to burst population; and alarmingly high inefficiency in the security institution in recent times, have caused a significant rise in crime activities in the city. The huge youth unemployment and widening income inequality in the metropolis have further exacerbated the situation.
As many, including residents and diplomats, continue filing theft, burglary and other criminal reports, the city administration is doing too little to match the scale of the problem. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Menna AsratJuly 27, 2019
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1min28200

Illegal migration has recently become a huge talking point on the world stage. From nationalist leaders railing against illegal migrants, to news reports of people dying while trying to make the treacherous sea crossing from North Africa to Europe, the plight of those trying to escape to other countries to make better lives for themselves is a controversial issue. Ethiopia, with one of the largest refugee populations in the world, is also one of the biggest points of outflow for migrants. But different bodies are trying to protect these vulnerable migrants from the traffickers and smugglers who are trading them like commodities. EBR’s Menna Asrat reports.


Menna AsratJune 28, 2019

1min11760
The Rising Popularity of Physiotherapy and Chiropractic Clinics

As people in urban areas such as Addis Ababa find themselves grappling with changing lifestyles and income levels, they are also becoming aware of the benefits of physiotherapy clinics. Once the domain of clinics and hospitals providing limited services to people with disabilities or those involved in accidents, physiotherapy education and services are spreading throughout the country. As the demand increases, the number of clinics is also steadily increasing, although insiders say there is a long way to go. EBR’s Menna Asrat reports.



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