Kiya AliNovember 29, 2019
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1min11790

Ethiopia is one of the few African countries to achieve a strong and broad economic growth in the past decade. But keeping up with this momentum has not been easy. The construction industry, one of the main engines to the economy, has come to a standstill. As many have become unemployed as a result of the slowdown, construction firms are experiencing loss and some are shifting to other sectors seeking better returns. EBR’s Kiya Ali reports.


Kiya AliNovember 29, 2019
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1min8130
Wildlife loss accelerating in Ethiopia

Globally, the decline of biodiversity is now recognized as one of today’s most serious environmental problems. The extinction of species is increasing, meaning they have disappeared forever. It is no different in Ethiopia. Wildlife biodiversity has shown a dramatic decline in recent years both in terms of type and size. The problem has been accelerating due to the expansion of agriculture, grazing land encroachment, illegal hunting, fishing, and natural catastrophes. The rapidly growing infrastructural expansion such as roads, government projects, and trans-boundary trade are also contributing to the loss of wildlife. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores the issue in depth.


Kiya AliNovember 29, 2019

1min7800
Time of happiness with big stress

Wedding planning and related expenses bring a serious financial strains to a new relationship. Although it is supposed to be the happiest time in a couple’s life, it is not an easy task to pursue. When couples imagine their dream wedding, the price tag is usually not part of that fantasy. In fact, with the rising cost of living, many have stopped organizing big weddings. But this does not mean for even a small one they won’t incur much. Anecdotal evidences suggest that an average wedding costs between ETB100, 000 to as much as millions of Birr in urban areas like Addis Ababa. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores the issue.


Kiya AliNovember 29, 2019
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1min8040
Infrastructure Developments Fail to Accommodate the Needs of Disabled Persons

Despite accounting for 17.6Pct of the population, people with disabilities are often note very well taken into consideration in many development projects in Ethiopia. Most Infrastructure is developed without taking into consideration their mobility and other physical challenges. For the deaf or visually impaired, most of the streets are not friendly. While sidewalks end abruptly and ramps which are the only means of getting in and out of premises, are so steep that wheelchairs sometimes overturn. In addition, apartment houses are constructed without accommodating the special needs of people with disabilities, as is with malls and buildings of government offices which are built recklessly with no elevators and ramps. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliNovember 29, 2019
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1min7570

Museums are an important place to learn about the history and culture of any country. But this does not seem to be well-understood in Ethiopia where museums are handled unprofessionally and are exposed to damages. While most museums don’t have enough facilities and are not well-preserved, they are also not visited by many tourists because of their poor records. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliOctober 29, 2019
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1min20330

Buying a car continues to be a daunting task in Ethiopia. Because of its unaffordability, many are forced to become commuters. Although there is hope that it would decline soon following the pledge of the government to reduce taxes on new cars, the price keeps on increasing every day. The local assemblers are also not in a position to fill the existing gap as they sell their cars for a price equal, if not higher, compared to the imported ones. The spike in the price of cars is also worsening the income inequality and implies that the value of the local currency is dwindling against the basket of major foreign currencies. EBR’s Kiya Ali reports.


Kiya AliOctober 29, 2019
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1min21290

Taxi-hailing services that use online-enabled platforms to connect passengers and drivers are becoming common in Addis Ababa. With the help of apps, these service providers are enabling customers to hail a cab and allow users to pay flat fare in advance, contrary to the metered taxis. The number of companies that provide such services are now six, an increase from two just three years ago. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores the progress of these companies as well as the challenges facing them.


Kiya AliOctober 29, 2019
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1min26200

The use of traditional bonesetters to treat musculoskeletal injuries is common in Ethiopia. Joro Shanko, who lost her sight while in grade five, is the most sought after by many in this regard. Gaining popularity among urbanites in Addis Ababa, she is known for healing many suffering from bone fractures and various complications. EBR’s Kiya Ali visited Joro at her house, where she provides services to her patients, to learn what makes her distinct.


Kiya AliOctober 29, 2019
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1min24360

Born in Gamo Gofa in the southern part of Ethiopia, Asgegnew Ashko accidentally became a singer while presenting a poem in an event held in Wolaita. Soon after realizing his skills, he was lucky enough to win the hearts of many Ethiopians living in the country and abroad. He has been able to garner more than 12 million views from his eight songs listed on YouTube and present his works in more than 15 countries and three continents. EBR’s Kiya Ali sat down with the 28-year-old singer to learn what makes him unique.


Kiya AliSeptember 28, 2019
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1min9790

Construction has boomed in Addis Ababa over the past decade. Shiny new high-rise blocks and shopping centers mushroomed all over the city, and the cranes dotting the skyline hint that more are on the way. Meanwhile, parks and green spaces became victim to urbanization, as private landowners and the state continuously look for space to build. Now, there are only 20 parks in the capital, which has more than four million residents and additional hundreds of thousands who go in and out of the city every day. Only 0.18Pct of Addis Ababa’s land mass is covered by parks and gardens. To improve the situation, the city administration embarked on various projects that targeted building of parks and green spaces. EBR’s Kiya Ali reports.



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