Kiya AliMarch 15, 2020
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1min3130

Over the past two decades, deposits mobilized by commercial banks have skyrocketed more than 300 times, thanks to the massive expansion strategies that they have adopted. Such growth does not, however, mean a boost in financial inclusion. About three-fourths of the Ethiopian population remains unbanked. To make matters worse, the rise in the cost of living, which has forced the real interest rate to remain in the below zero territory, is already discouraging both the banked and unbanked population from depositing their money in banks, especially in urban areas. As a result, the contribution of saving towards the economy remains low, and is further exacerbated by the inflationary pressure that is eating the disposable incomes of citizens. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliMarch 15, 2020
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1min2440

Contemporary dance is growing in Ethiopian cities and towns. Talented youth in relatively large numbers join the dancing world despite the absence of specialized institutions or training centers teaching the art. It is also becoming a source of income for youngsters, although the payment is not ‘commensurate’ with their efforts. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliFebruary 15, 2020
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1min7000

Once home to emperors of the imperial times of Ethiopia, and later serving as a torture facility for Dergue regime, Unity Park has become the talk of the town since its opening three months ago. Financed by the United Arab Emirates, the construction of the Park cost more than USD160 million. The park displays what Ethiopia looked like during the 19th and 20th centuries along with Ethiopia’s great and recent emperors, including Emperor Menelik II and Emperor Haile Selassie, both of whom are featured with life-size waxwork statues. It also features the post-1991 political works of EPRDF-led government in the form of sculptures in the garden, representing the nine ethnic-based regional states. EBR’s Kiya Ali, who visited the park last month, explores.


Kiya AliFebruary 15, 2020
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1min3800

For an Ethiopian who has not been there before, groups of people who play music loudly in the middle of sidewalks and colorful matatus are distinct characteristics of Kenya’s capital, Nairobi. A Pentecostal preaching the Bible on the side of the road, long queues for transportation, and deafening music from boutiques, on the other hand, are commonalities the city holds with the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. EBR’s Kiya Ali, who visited Nairobi last month, explores.


Kiya AliFebruary 15, 2020
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1min6500

Abebech Gobena defines selfless giving, even losing her marriage to help someone in dire need of help. Life-long friends and colleagues witness her altruistic acts. Indeed, she is a living testament that someone’s inner candle will not go off as long as it lights up another candle. Her endeavors range from caring for children in need as well as economically developing other members of her community. Her work is perhaps the first of its kind in Ethiopia—an inspiration to many—and her name and goodwill will live long. EBR’s Kiya Ali looks into this exceptional woman’s life and work.


Kiya AliFebruary 15, 2020
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1min7400

It is long known that the local Amharic language film industry is struggling. Long gone are the heydays of the sector, now dominated by cinema hall corruption, increasing costs, lack of creativity, imitation of foreign films and a lackadaisical audience. Though there are high quality films released, audiences seem to have been numbed by the sheer number of inferior movies. To bring the sector out of its slumber, industry insiders recommend tapping into Ethiopia’s rich pool of cultural and historical assets, implementing knowledge-based film making, recognizing the broad-based positive impact of cinema, and garnering due attention from government bodies. EBR’s Kiya Ali takes a look.


Kiya AliJanuary 1, 2020
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1min6020

Being home to many internationally-acclaimed historical sites, Ethiopia has an immense local tourism potential. But the country has never capitalized on the opportunity. Adding to the minimal travelling habit amongst Ethiopians, the sector is still at its infancy. Tour companies also give more attention to international tourists, largely because it garners foreign currency. Investors are not interested in joining the local tourism sector as there is a sentiment that it is a low rate-of-return investment. Meanwhile, the Ministry of Culture and Tourism is attempting to create awareness amongst the public, but little has been achieved thus far. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliJanuary 1, 2020
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1min8690

In the past, very few traditional/ cultural restaurants operated in Addis and most of them were criticized for lacking diversity and failing to portray the culture and foods of all Ethiopians. Lately however, traditional restaurants specialized on the foods of a certain ethnic group are rising. Among them are Sidama, Wolayita and Oromo (Wollega) traditional food restaurants. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliDecember 12, 2019
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1min7000
Is it applicable in Ethiopia

Recently, officials of the National Bank of Ethiopia (NBE) pledged to implement a market-driven exchange rate regime over the next three years. Governor of the NBE, Yinager Dessie, said that his government will opt for a more flexible foreign exchange market to stabilize the level of its currency, deemed overvalued by the IMF. While this is a decision welcomed by the Bretton Woods institutions, it also stirred up controversies over its relevance in solving the forex crisis which has existed for over two decades. Experts fear that it would worsen inflationary pressures and result in an economic crisis shortly thereafter. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores.


Kiya AliDecember 12, 2019
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1min6570

Neither homeless people nor street children are not new to Addis Ababa. They have existed for decades along with the growing urbanization in the country. Now it is believed that there are more than 150,000 street children and homeless people in Ethiopia and more than half of them live on the streets of the capital. The problem is far from over, even after the rehabilitation programs implemented by the city administration, federal government, and NGOs. EBR’s Kiya Ali writes.



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