1min25600

The Blue Nile is an everlasting bond between riparian countries. For millennia, the river amassed water from upper riparian countries and provided Sudan and Egypt a life line. It has, however, been the Egyptians who relied heavily on the longest river in the world. The Greeks even called Egypt “the Gift of the Nile.” Considering Ethiopia contributes 85Pct of the Nile waters, it would be logical to say that ‘Egypt is the gift of Ethiopia.’ Despite its tremendous share of the Nile waters, Ethiopia has never used the river. On the other hand, Egypt does not contribute a drop to the river; however, it claims to have historic use rights that should not been questioned.



1min24800

According to the AfDB report released in June 2020, only 15 African countries have foreign currency reserves that cover their import for over five months. These countries either have oil resource or they have small import proportion. The African average is 3.2 months. ‘Countries with low foreign currency reserve will have less room to import medical equipment under the covid19 era’, according to the report.


Ashenafi EndaleAugust 15, 2020
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1min29490

Yohannes Ayalew Birru (PhD) is Deputy Director General and Head of Macroeconomic and Financial Policy Studies Cluster, at the Policy Studies Institute in Ethiopia. Between June and November 2018, he served as Executive Director of the Ethiopian Economic Policy and Research Institute.

Yohannes also served at the National Bank of Ethiopia for about 27 years, of which he served as the Vice Governor and Chief Economist of the National Bank of Ethiopia, a position he held for about nine years between 2009 and 2018. In total, Yohannes has 30 years of cumulative experience in the areas of finance, macroeconomic policy and economic growth. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Sussex, United Kingdom. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale spoke to him about the problems in the financial sector.


Ashenafi EndaleAugust 15, 2020
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1min44991

Cut-throat Moves to Legitimize Cutting-edge Technology

The paramount friction between science and nature resumed afresh in Ethiopia, following the government’s commercialization of GMO varieties through selected farmers and the appreciation report released by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) in February, 2020. Following the amendment of Ethiopia’s strict biosafety laws in 2015, half a dozen farmers in Gambela and Benishangul regions cultivated Bt cotton in 2019 for the first time. The move is soon to be followed by GMO maize and Enset. Government officials and proponents of the technology argue that GMO is the silver bullet to do away with food insecurity. Nonetheless, growing anti-GMO groups are concerned over what they call ‘the irrationality’ behind the governmental rush for GMO. The poor productivity of the first GMO farms is also a major setback for proponents of the latest GMO manoeuvring around Ethiopia’s millennia old agriculture. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale investigates the debates to offer this report.


Kiya AliAugust 15, 2020
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1min30530

It has been quite a long time since mobile banking started in Ethiopia. However, its penetration is still very small considering the potential size of the market. With branch expansion taken as the primary goal of banks to expand their services to people in all corners of the country, mobile and agent banking seem to be in the back burner. However, poor banking infrastructure outside of the capital Addis Ababa seems to have raised the relevance of mobile banking in some regions of the country. EBR’s Kiya Ali looks into the expanding mobile banking market in the country.


Kiya AliAugust 15, 2020
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1min26460

Ethiopia, along with countries like China and Bangladesh, is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. The second African most populous country achieved a commendable economic trajectory in the last two decades. Although the rate is a subject of debate among scholars and policymakers, the government claims an average of 9.9Pct growth was achieved in the past 10 years. This was corroborated by the various mega construction and other major infrastructural projects implemented during the period. Though this has helped the country achieve the title of ‘African Tiger’, it has piled up the country’s debt, both external and domestic. EBR’s Kiya Ali explores the dangers of domestic debt piles.


Kiya AliAugust 15, 2020
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1min31200
COVID-19 Interventions Support has Left Commercial Sex Workers Behind

Commercial sex workers make up one of the most stigmatized group of people outcast by society. With the advent of COVID-19 in Ethiopia and the subsequent strains on normal social interactions, commercial sex workers have been forced to refrain from sexual engagements with their clients. The latter have also quit visiting sex workers. The situation has left the commercial sex workers with quite a predicament as their dried income makes it hard for them to pay for food and rent while breaching social distancing rules could jeopardize their health as well as those around them. EBR’s Kiya Ali looks into the matter.


Kiya AliAugust 15, 2020
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1min24990
The Flourishing Art of Special Effects and Prosthetic Makeup

As Ethiopian films fundamentally offer ‘normal’ characters with minor or no special
features on their bodies, the role of special effects and prosthetic makeup has been very minimal in Ethiopian film making. That might be about to change as a new breed of young talent is taking up special effects and prosthetic makeup. Kiya Ali explores.


Abebe AsamereAugust 15, 2020

1min24290
What to Expect From the Government

It is a universal truth that governments should protect the rights of citizens and one of such rights is the right to property. This right is not an ordinary right that can be infringed by anyone and it is more of a human right that needs protection from the government. This truth is also part of our constitution and the international human rights conventions Ethiopia adopted as part of its domestic law.


Tsegaye Tegenu (PhD)August 15, 2020

1min24040
Thinking Exponentially

Ethiopia is the second most populous country in sub-Saharan Africa after Nigeria. Current population is about 112 million and is expected to surpass 137 million by the end of 2037. During the twentieth century, the growth of the Ethiopian population quickened tremendously. It had grown more than ten times since 1900, five times since 1950 and had doubled since the early 1990s. The rate of population growth increased from less than 2% in the 1950s to a peak of 3% in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Since then the population increased at a decreasing rate reaching a minimum of 2,3% during the 2015-2020 period. Each year, an estimated 2 million persons are added to the population.



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