Ethiopian Business Review

Ethiopia is endowed with extensive natural resources such as fertile soil, abundant water resources and favorable climatic condition that make the country suitable for the development of different varieties of flowers, vegetables, fruits and herbs. Despite this, the country has not benefited from the sector as expected. 

Lack of adequate attention given to the sector by the government, years of insufficient investment by the private sector, and the absence of skilled human resource and technologies are among the major factors that thwart the country from reaping the benefits of its potential in the sub sector.

To avert the trend, Ethiopia, the second largest flower exporter in Africa after Kenya, recently launched the National Horticulture Development and Transaction Strategy. The strategy highlights the plan to create conducive environment for modernized horticulture development. EBR’s Mikiyas Tesfaye has gone through the document and conversed with major stakeholders to offer this report.

Friday, 01 December 2017 06:00
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As the Ethiopian economy began to significantly expand in the last fifteen years, the demand for paper and paper products has also witnessed huge growth. In 2016/17 the demand for paper was 219,840 tons. However, the country managed to satisfy only 18Pct of the demand. The balance has always been matched by imports.

There are six companies currently engaged in the production of rolls of paper sheets from pulp and recycled paper. Although a small number of companies operate in the paper conversion sector, there is no paper mill company in the country. As a result, the country spends millions of scarce hard currency to import paper products. EBR’s Ashenafi Endale explores the issue to offer this report.

Wednesday, 01 November 2017 06:00
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The Ethiopian government estimates that it has more than two million Ethiopian-born people who comprise its vast global diaspora, living in the United States, Europe, Australia and the Middle East, among other places. Much of the diasporic migration took place during the Derg regime (1974-1991); before that, during the time of the Emperor, it was common to see Ethiopians attending institutions of higher education abroad and returning home from western countries. 

Tuesday, 09 December 2014 12:00
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