Ethiopian Business Review

Abebe Asamere

Abebe Asamere

Abebe Asamere holds an LLB in Law and BA in Political Science and International Relations from AAU. He was a member of the executive committee and pro bono legal advisor of the Ethiopian Consumers Protection Association for six years. Later on he became president of the Association for about a year. Since 2000, he has been working as consultant and attorney at Law. He was also teaching business law at the School of Commerce at AAU on part time basis for several years. Comments can be sent to abebe.a@ethiopianbusinessreview.com or aasamere@yahoo.com

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The World Bank country office in Ethiopia, apparently in response to the request by the government of Ethiopia, has conducted a survey of Chinese FDI (Foreign Direct Investment) in Ethiopia in November 2012. This is a commendable job on the part of the World Bank as Chinese related investments are increasingly becoming important not only in Ethiopia but also across the continent.

As the biggest economy in Africa, with a GDP of 419.92 billion US Dollar in 2010 according to the Global Finance, and labeled by the World Bank as one of the four upper middle income countries in Africa, South Africa is a preferred destination for refugees from poor nations in its backyard such as Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Malawi and other distant African countries like Nigeria and Ethiopia.

Applying some form of regulatory measure on the activities of businesses is always one of the major concerns of every nation. This is critically important to regulate the economic, social and political life of their citizens. Among the forms of regulatory measures, licensing is the most common instrument.

Business licenses are permits, issued, inspected and revoked by government agencies, that allow individuals or companies to conduct businesses within their jurisdiction. This doesn’t, however, mean that business licensing is a standard requirement in every nation.