Ethiopian Business Review

Liyou Libsekal

Liyou Libsekal

When Sara Mohammad was 12 years old, she was a little girl with big dreams. She told EBR that this was the age she decided she would grow up to be a businesswoman. If she had any naysayers, her newest achievement must surely quiet them.   This year, the designer and founder of the first fashion school in Ethiopia, Next Design Institute, received the Association of Women in Business’ Women of Excellence Award.  A humble woman, the designer and former model talks of the utter surprise she felt when she found out she would be this year’s recipient. If anyone knows anything about this particular businesswoman, it is that she is a pioneer in her field;  and of course all pioneers have to fight to break new ground; so how did she do it? We can find her strength and resilience in the crooks of her past. 

Mavericks at Work explores some of the most successful, innovative businesses in the US, presenting the reader with the goals, strategies and methods that have made companies powerhouses in their respective industries.  The authors, Taylor and LaBarre, both respectable business analysts have their finger on the pulse of business evolution. They go further than simply citing creativity as a key to success, and truly delve into the minds of  nonconformist leaders, revealing how these mavericks distinguish their companies and businesses through marketing, strategy and recruitment, and company culture.

With its ancient and complex history, tradition and ceremonies, Ethiopia has not only left the relics of a distinctive past in the form of tangible monuments, churches and castles, but has also held on tightly to its variety of rich, deep-rooted religious and secular traditions. Not only is preserving Ethiopia’s unique culture vital from a historical perspective, its untapped tourism potential is a powerful tool for economic development. Addis Abeba is comparatively young and it has not yet lived up to its promise of attracting a large number of tourists to visit the country’s historical sites. Conferences have been booming in Addis and have brought a plethora of new hotels to the city and tourism is on the brink of major change. The sheer number of foreigners that come to the capital simply for business and conferences has catapulted in the past several years and the impact can be seen in all the hotels being constructed.